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...in Greatest Hits: Wagner, NY Phil

Postby evilcartman » Sat Jan 22, 2005 3:21 pm

This may seem like a bonehead question but...

This is the album in question....

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000002A1V/ref=no-sim/tubenet

I happen to be borrowing this CD from a friend and I just wanted to double check who played tuba with the NY Phil. under Zubin Mehta. I'm guessing it was Warren Deck because in the "Ride" on this CD he absolutely demolishes the rest of the orchestra when he comes in with the famous motif near the end. It sounds like Mr. Deck to me but I don't listen to enough NY Phil recordings to be totally sure. I do know there are few tubists that can lay it down like he (if it is Mr. Deck) did on this recording of the "Ride". The first time I listened to it all I could say is "Wow..." :shock:

Any input would be appreciated...
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Postby tuba4sissies » Sat Jan 22, 2005 4:25 pm

I know this may be off-topic. that song>all. :shock: haha. by your describtion of this player, i think i mght pick up a CD of his. :P
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Re: ...in Greatest Hits: Wagner, NY Phil

Postby UncleBeer » Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:34 pm

evilcartman wrote: I'm guessing it was Warren Deck because in the "Ride" on this CD he absolutely demolishes the rest of the orchestra when he comes in with the famous motif near the end.


I've owned and enjoyed that recording for years. I never thought he "demolished" anything, but played with a very big, controlled sound. It's definitely Warren, as I discussed this recording with him once.
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Postby evilcartman » Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:57 pm

I didn't mean "demolished" as a bad thing....poor choice of words on my part. I meant it in the way that he was able to project through the whole orchestra as well as that great NY Phil brass section and still have a huge sound. No bashing here....he's a great player with a great sound. That's all...

Thanks for the confirmation
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Postby tuba4sissies » Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:43 pm

He played loud and proud? :D
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Postby scottmendoker » Sat Jan 22, 2005 7:38 pm

Got a funny story about that recording of the "Ride". They did lots of takes and on one and ONLY one take, one of the trombones came in early on their very first entrance. This person turned to the trombone player next to him and said, "Watch - that will be the one they take!!?" So, put on your headphones and/or crank up your stereo - it's there. That's the one they took.
It's a wonderful recording. And, it led to a series of just remarkable recordings w/Mehta. If you don't own the following, get them (if they're still available): The label is TELDEC - Mahler #5, Rite of Spring and Symphony in Three Movements, Sibelius #2 and Finlandia, The Planets. All these were done around the time that Mehta announced his resignation - around 1990 or so.
Warren sounded incredible - always - and especially on these CDs.
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Postby Bill Troiano » Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:12 pm

Warren was our guest at our SCMEA Tuba Day in 1984. As part of his evening performance, he played a few orchestral excerpts. Someone from the audience asked him if he could play "The Ride" for us. Warren prefaced playing it by stating something to the effect that, as loud as I'm going to play this right now, that because of the register that it's in, and because of the trombones playing above it, that you won't hear the tuba in an orchestra, but more that you will feel it. I already owned the cd and when I listened to it the next day, I was amazed at how clearly you could hear Warren - amazing playing! My first thoughts at the time were that perhaps they mixed the recording to make the tuba more prominent. I only thought that because Warren said that you wouldn't really hear the tuba. To this day, I never tried to find out if that was true. I know that on a recording of the LA Philharmonic playing "1812" and "Romeo and Juliet", Roger Bobo was playing a 184 or 185 Miraphone and he was as clear as a bell. But, on that recording, you could hear the recording engineer playing around with sound levels, which disturbed me greatly at the time when I bought that recording. Still, Roger sounded great, even on the small horn. Sorry for rambling! Good luck to all of you north easterners who have to dig out of the blizzard. We have about 18 in. on the ground now with the snow winding down, but we still have high wind gusts causing some 3-4 ft. drifts. Sorry for rambling again!
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Postby UncleBeer » Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:17 pm

Bill Troiano wrote:I already owned the cd and when I listened to it the next day, I was amazed at how clearly you could hear Warren - amazing playing! My first thoughts at the time were that perhaps they mixed the recording to make the tuba more prominent.


I know it was recorded at SUNY Purchase, which is a pretty tuba-friendly hall, but I distinctly remember sitting many times in Avery Fisher Hall, and feeling Warren's sound resonating in the floor! :shock:
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Postby evilcartman » Sun Jan 23, 2005 4:12 pm

Bill Troiano wrote:I was amazed at how clearly you could hear Warren



Yeah that's what really took me by surprise. It wasn't that he was putting out alot of sound but that he could be heard so clearly over the rest of the brass section. For 'most' people the 'Ride' is very hard to project due to the reasons Mr. Deck had stated to you. On top of that he had to project through a world-class brass section. Man, he really is an amazing player and even that's probably an understatement to his abilities...
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Postby Doc » Mon Jan 24, 2005 12:01 am

Scott,
I have those recordings, and they are worth every penny.

What about "Dawn", where he and Don Harwood completely subjugate the orchestra where the tuba runs up to Eb, meeting the bass bone? That's power. I always thought it was like the Jacobs/Kleinhammer sound, except on steroids. In college, we used to say it was an "I own you" kind of complete domination from the back row. Fantastic power and presence.

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