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Learning Jazz

Postby MacedoniaTuba » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:17 am

Hey guys, any jazz books for tuba or bass you would like to recommend for a begginer?
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby pecktime » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:16 am

Jamey aebersold volume 1.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby opus37 » Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:38 am

Jamey Aebersold Maiden Voyage is a little more basic than Volume 1, both are worth a look.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Three Valves » Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:02 am

Don't these have bass tracks in them and are designed for featured artists??
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby UncleBeer » Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:26 am

Three Valves wrote:Don't these have bass tracks in them and are designed for featured artists??

On Aebersolds, the bass is in the left channel, piano the right channel, and drums are mixed to the middle. If you want to work on bass lines, just turn down that channel.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Three Valves » Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:17 am

Or I could switch to Euphonium and play lead...
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby UncleBeer » Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:36 am

And who says tubas can't solo over changes?
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Bill Troiano » Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:34 am

Arban's !!

Remember in the Karate Kid movie how Mr. Miyagi, who was training Daniel to fight, had him doing chores around his house. He had Daniel waxing cars and painting fences. When Daniel eventually angrily confronted Miyagi wanting to know how this helps him fight, Miyagi physically attacked him, whereby Daniel defended himself with the motions instilled in him from painting fences and waxing cars.

Learn the exercises in the Arban's book cold - years of practice. Then, you can apply those to improvising bass lines and solos.

Honestly, I feel that's how I developed into being able to play jazz. Nobody told me to do this and when I did spend years playing Arban, I had no plan or thought as to using it to learn to play jazz. It just happened. Sort of like painting fences to learn karate.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby swillafew » Wed Aug 09, 2017 11:35 am

There is a duet book for Trombone, "Hip to the Blues". You will need something to jump start your practice will a play-a-long product, and these duets are well worth the money to get you started.

Training your fingers to include flatted notes in your majors scales is worth the time spent, 3rds and 7ths in particular.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Three Valves » Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:17 pm

UncleBeer wrote:And who says tubas can't solo over changes?


Well there is that!!

How about a source for CDs or MP3s (only) of his Real Book series??

I already have the Real Books in Bass Clef...
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby bloke » Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:18 pm

If going the direction mostly discussed in the previous posts ("straight-ahead" jazz standards), I would recommend going with slide trombone, valve trombone, or double bass.

As much as we've been exposed to tubas/euphoniums playing "straight-ahead" jazz (conferences, recordings, inside of academia, etc.), truth be told, the (rare) straight-ahead jazz gig (outside of academia) rarely includes a tuba or a euphonium. "Evangelism/mission work" (ref: Harvey Philips, played really great, but who also read all of his solos) are one type of thing, but "being called for real gigs" is yet another. ...Please notice that I used the word "rare" and "rarely" in the same sentence: i.e. "a small percentage of something that isn't particularly common in the first place".

Developing "tenor-voiced instrument" jazz skills, you may (??) be last call (behind two or three good jazz slide trombonists and/or some tenor saxophonists), but you'll still be on the list. Double bass...?? The same comment applies.

If, mostly, you're hoping to learn how to play traditional/dixieland jazz (??), generally-speaking, the chord changes of tunes typically chosen to play in that style move by more quickly, and the "the particular bass line chord tones chosen" are more critical to an overall good ensemble sound. (Listening to recordings, when I begin to even have just a ~little~ bit of "fun" with chord changes when playing traditional jazz/dixieland - still playing "no wrong notes" - my ears tell me that it detracts. :| ...i.e. "Just play it like the record, bloke." ) The best way to approach traditional/dixieland jazz is to (well...) learn a whole bunch of songs' bass lines. It's best to do this from recordings (youtube is your friend), as your ears will grow much more via this method (as will your on-the-fly analytical abilities). Further, your ears and your musical tastes (sure: basically derived from your ears' knowledge of "what a Bach chorale bass line should sound like") will tell you which recordings to emulate and which ones to ignore. Just like tuba solo performances on youtube, there are MANY bad traditional jazz performances, and a FEW good ones. Discerning between those two types (organized, harmonic, ensemble-oriented vs. cacophony, show-off nonsense, every-man-for-himself) is not rocket science.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Three Valves » Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:22 pm

Wasn't one of the Dorsey Brothers a Jazz Euphonium-ist??

You know, the one I can't recall and no one has ever heard of??

8)
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Art Hovey » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:52 pm

You don't learn jazz from books. Find recordings that you like, pick up the horn and play along with them when nobody else is home. Learn the bass lines by listening and imitating the good ones. (It really helps to learn how to bang out chords on a keyboard or guitar or even a ukelele.) Learn the melodies by listening to good singers. Stay off the bass lines when you are soloing. Stay close to the melody instead, with some ornamentation.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby bloke » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:34 am

Art Hovey wrote:You don't learn jazz from books. Find recordings that you like, pick up the horn and play along with them when nobody else is home. Learn the bass lines by listening and imitating the good ones. (It really helps to learn how to bang out chords on a keyboard or guitar or even a ukulele.) Learn the melodies by listening to good singers. Stay off the bass lines when you are soloing. Stay close to the melody instead, with some ornamentation.


valid.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby pecktime » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:49 am

I agree with Mr Bloke about straight-ahead jazz.

I started on saxophone/ clarinet/ flute, then learnt double bass. I learnt tuba after joining a trad jazz group and finding that bass sax was too quiet acoustically.

I have never been hired to play straight-ahead tuba. As a jobbing musician I will play whatever instrument the band leader wants, I believe most tuba players could easily pick up the electric and double bass and widen their gigging possibilities.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby quesonegro » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:57 pm

Find a good teacher, doesn't have to be a tuba player, just a good jazz teacher, maybe a bass player...
it'll save you a lot of time and effort! It's not magic, just takes a lot of work, just like any mastering other kind of music!
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby bloke » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:10 pm

I believe that many players who only play written and memorized pitches view "jazz" as just another category of skills, such as scales, arpeggios, lip trills, slurs, double-tonguing, playing loud, playing soft, playing excerpts, imitating someone's else pleasing phrasing style, etc...

..."a trick", if you will. :|

A lifelong pursuit of developing the skills required to play music whereby every pitch and every nuance is not dictated to the player and not pre-planned - and doing this sort of thing very well - is both an expanding and a humbling experience.
Last edited by bloke on Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Casca Grossa » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:12 pm

quesonegro wrote:Find a good teacher, doesn't have to be a tuba player, just a good jazz teacher, maybe a bass player...
it'll save you a lot of time and effort! It's not magic, just takes a lot of work, just like any mastering other kind of music!


I heard that an incredible jazz musician based in Germany who does amazing work on bass trombone, tuba, cimbasso, and many other instruments, is now offering online lessons. ;-)
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Casca Grossa » Mon Aug 14, 2017 2:35 pm

Some really nice straight ahead jazz tuba. I agree that this is very rare but still some good stuff...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjQqmirZsG0
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Re: Learning Jazz

Postby Three Valves » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:58 am

-$30.00 I only listen to chord progression, a swinging bass and ride drum anyway.

240 numbers

Listened to it in the car this morning.

8)

https://www.amazon.com/Real-Book-Play-A ... +book+jazz
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