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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby Stryk » Thu Apr 18, 2019 8:57 pm

toobagrowl wrote:Funny thread :P Stryk seems kinda obsessed with this topic from his threads "What constitutes a professional tuba" and "How good is good enough" regarding tubas.


I just see people wanting more and more expensive horns with more and more valves and gadgets on them and in them. The video in the original "good enough" post made me think - how good of a horn do you really need? Do I *NEED* a $40k YamaYork? No way. Would I like one? Maybe. Does Chris Olka need one? Probably so. The horns I have work for me, the horns Joe has work for him, and the horns Chris has work for him - and they are all different. VERY different. A couple points others have made, I think answer the question. First professional horns are ones that make you money, and ones that tend to last for an extended period of time under heavy use. In my opinion, the price, the beauty, the origin, the size, or the number of valves have nothing to do with it. Of course this is from a guy that doesn't think it will be long before someone wins a job in a major symphony with a Chinese horn. As always, your mileage may vary.
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby bloke » Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:14 pm

Were it that I desired ownership of a YCB-826S (or a knock-off of this knock-off), I'd own one. Many claim that they are too expensive, yet many bowed stringed instruments used in per-service, college, and amateur orchestras in the USA cost considerably more.

To the other comment, these (shown below) are the "3-valve tubas" of the woodwind world:

Image1
Image
Image

As we've all seen demonstrated either in videos or in-person, some very determined musicians can make these sound nearly as good as some modern woodwind instruments, just as can a few very determined tuba players with 3-valve tubas.

#1 intonation
#2 voicing/resonance
#3 everything else

Cleverly/thoughtfully-designed additional gadgets can help.
Pianists use all ten fingers, and every piano note has ten alternate fingerings.

Finally, I've seen several people here claim that 5th valves (never mentioning 6th valves, for whatever reason) "mess up" the playability of tubas. I wonder why - then - they have not experimented with the removal of 4th valves...perhaps because they're more difficult to remove, or due to other reasons...??

bloke "Two of our three vehicles (just lately) have electric windows and door locks. Two of them have door-opening 'fob's. Only one of them has an automatic transmission - the one without a 'fob'. All have FM radios, and one of them plays c.d.'s. All of their seats are manually adjusted. None have talking-anything, none tell me where I am, and none offer cell nor internet anything. They are - if you will - some of 'the three-valve tubas of the vehicle world'."
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby Leland » Sat Apr 20, 2019 7:27 pm

Leland wrote:I got paid more while playing a 2-valve G contra than while playing anything else. So that's "professional".

This is what I said earlier. Snark aside, though...

I'd use the "professional" label when an instrument has extra features that can, potentially, be a liability when used only part-time or in a physically risky setting. Things like tuning slide triggers or valve gutters are good if the player is careful to avoid damaging them and maintains them regularly, but they can be more pieces to lose or bend when handled by a middle schooler.

And, dare I say it, if a player is still only trying to mash the right buttons and hopefully not frack any attacks, the extra labor and expense that went into a hand-hammered one-piece bell is pretty much wasted. Even more so if there's any question whether the player might continue after leaving band to join the soccer team.
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby Dan Tuba » Sat Apr 20, 2019 7:49 pm

Stryk wrote:
toobagrowl wrote:Funny thread :P Stryk seems kinda obsessed with this topic from his threads "What constitutes a professional tuba" and "How good is good enough" regarding tubas.


I just see people wanting more and more expensive horns with more and more valves and gadgets on them and in them. The video in the original "good enough" post made me think - how good of a horn do you really need? Do I *NEED* a $40k YamaYork? No way. Would I like one? Maybe. Does Chris Olka need one? Probably so. The horns I have work for me, the horns Joe has work for him, and the horns Chris has work for him - and they are all different. VERY different. A couple points others have made, I think answer the question. First professional horns are ones that make you money, and ones that tend to last for an extended period of time under heavy use. In my opinion, the price, the beauty, the origin, the size, or the number of valves have nothing to do with it. Of course this is from a guy that doesn't think it will be long before someone wins a job in a major symphony with a Chinese horn. As always, your mileage may vary.


I wouldn't hesitate to use my BMB J765 BBb tuba at work. It's a very nice tuba and I love playing it in community groups. The Chinese manufacturers are making some really nice playing tubas. With that said, my work provides me with a MW 195P, which is hard "playability" wise to beat.

To answer your question "what constitutes a professional tuba?"
Well, for me, it's whatever tuba or tubas that I can make the most music with(Intonation, Articulation, phrasing, time, dynamic contrast, timbre), with the least amount of hassle, and if playing with others whatever, tuba that makes the ensemble sound good.
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby KiltieTuba » Sat Apr 20, 2019 9:43 pm

If you’re getting paid, it’s a professional tuba.
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby bloke » Sun Apr 21, 2019 4:39 pm

KiltieTuba wrote:If you’re getting paid, it’s a professional tuba.


anything with at least a 28" bell and a 9" bell collar :wink:
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby anotherjtm2 » Sun Apr 21, 2019 10:32 pm

bloke wrote:anything with at least a 28" bell and a 9" bell collar :wink:


wow
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby bloke » Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:49 pm

otherwise, all double-belled silver-colored Eb sousaphones
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Re: What constitures a professional tuba?

Postby swillafew » Thu May 02, 2019 9:21 am

A favorite instructor would say, "that thing won't make a sound until you pick it up".

I have read that guitarists must own whatever axe the person who hired them expects to see. A studio musician allowed that he had 35 guitars after 35 years of playing, according to the "needs" of each year.
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