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help identifying Alexander 164-ish tuba

Postby bone-a-phone » Tue Jun 11, 2019 9:16 pm

I need some help identifying an instrument. It's obviously old, and can be traced back only to the 1960s, and it seems to be at least "Alexander 164-ish". BBb.

It has been suggested that it is not Alexander production, but "hand made", whatever that is supposed to mean. This is really all I have to go on for now, I may be able to get more info later. It seems to me that this may be from some anonymous german maker. Someone suggested it was from early 1900's but I'm doubting that.

Can anyone glean any useful information from this admittedly insufficient set of clues? Particularly interested in age and place of origin, and possible makers if you can get that far.

It looks similar to this other horn posted here a couple years ago: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=67116

Image
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Re: help identifying Alexander 164-ish tuba

Postby Tom Gregory » Tue Jun 11, 2019 10:14 pm

The lyre holder looks kind of Heisner
The rest maybe Kruspe
Just guesses
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Re: help identifying Alexander 164-ish tuba

Postby bone-a-phone » Wed Jun 12, 2019 8:43 am

Thanks, Tom. KRUSPE is as good a guess as I've seen. But that still puts it somewhere between late 1800s and 1966. We're string linkages in use before a certain period for tubas?
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Re: help identifying Alexander 164-ish tuba

Postby bone-a-phone » Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:14 pm

Ok, I think I'm narrowing this down. It appears to be a Walter Sear imported from Amati, built from Cerveny parts. It was a corroded pile of scrap metal found by Walter in a storage closet in 1966, so was probably an experiment or a defect. ~18" bell, 37-38" tall. In the current catalog, it looks most like a Cerveny 686-4. It doesn't resemble any of the Amati models. There is some reference in some of the tubenet articles that some horns were "pirate" models - probably assembled from spare parts, which kind of seems to fit the story behind this horn.

It has an interesting V shaped seam in the bell that I've never seen before.
Image


He also seemed to bring in some Belgian horns of different design, but the kaisers were Cerveny/Amati.

viewtopic.php?t=7146&p=53993
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