Green tuba transportation

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cjk
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Re: Green tuba transportation

Post by cjk »

Here's the green tuba you were looking for
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tofu
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Re: Green tuba transportation

Post by tofu »

Donn wrote:Does anyone there use trailers? It looks to me like your load costs you some visibility.
I've actually used a trailer with one of my horns in it's MTS 1207 case. Bought it originally for hauling a child on century rides as it's main purpose. No ordinary trailer though, built out of tig welded lightweight aerospace aluminum, full size racing wheels to match my tri-bike, has its own independent brakes on each wheel that balance/distribute the braking load and can self actuate in the event the trailer were to break away as well as prevent the habit of trailers trying to pass you downhill in the mountains - keeps the back end from getting squirrley, has a full roll-bar system in the event of a crash and mounts to the seat post (versus the usual rear stay mount on most trailers) on a ball (with a secondary tether in the event of a catastrophic post failure) which allows incredibly tight turning/tracking. Very lightweight - you don't know it's even behind you and for a sizable rig it's aerodynamic with it covering on. Once my kid got to big I used the optional conversion package to turn it into a pet trailer (hauling both my 85 lb and 95 lb dogs) and as a cargo trailer for grocery runs and occasionally hauling my 2341 King to band rehearsal 12 miles away. I think the load capacity is something like 650lbs, but I've never exceeded 200 lbs the dogs being the heaviest load to date. Built by a former aerospace engineer out west - I forget where exactly as it was some years ago. Expensive compared to other trailers, but worth it with a young child as the cargo. The horn fits just inside the roll-bars and bell down - vertical. Easily able to do an average 20-22 mph with it.

Those Dutch cargo bikes are sturdy as hell, but I personally could never deal with that slow clumsy steering and all that weight out in front. Plus I like completely clean sight lines and being able to see pot holes at the last minute & have the responsive steering to avoid them. They're not built for speed, but durability. Angle Lake Cyclery out your way in Seattle used to sell those cargo bikes. I bought an Alex Moulton from them years ago and remember seeing they also had those imported Dutch built cargo bikes. Don't know if Angle Lake is still in business or if they still carry them. There is a fellow foster in my dog rescue who has one that is dedicated to hauling beer kegs to parties.
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Donn
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Re: Green tuba transportation

Post by Donn »

tofu wrote:I've actually used a trailer with one of my horns in it's MTS 1207 case. Bought it originally for hauling a child on century rides as it's main purpose.
It's funny how often that's the load, in a bicycle trailer. Like it's the only thing you'd need to carry - kids or dogs. Never had either, but I've carried various large musical instruments including tubas. Took a lot of stuff to the dump once. The trailer I have now was store bought, but most of this transporting was done with home made trailers. The best made of ABS plastic drain pipe and full size wheels, big and light. Besides the risk of tipping over in a curve, another problem with large trailers is that if you gauge passing distance wrong, the trailer is going to smack into parked cars or whatever obstacles.
Angle Lake Cyclery out your way in Seattle used to sell those cargo bikes. I bought an Alex Moulton from them years ago and remember seeing they also had those imported Dutch built cargo bikes. Don't know if Angle Lake is still in business or if they still carry them.
I thought they were defunct, but it turns out they just moved. I'd be a little surprised if Moultons are still a thing, but you never know, and in any case they might have one or two in the pile.

The only Dutch bike I ever rode, just "around the parking lot", had what felt to me like a terrible riding position - too upright, and it turned out to be harder than I expected, to exert force on the pedals from that position. It was a small business dedicated to importing this kind of bicycle - very well made and with practical details unknown to US/Chinese bicycles.
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