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Re: one of the many reasons I choose to not sell these

Postby bort » Fri Nov 02, 2018 4:22 pm

Maybe they end up in 3rd world countries... like pre-printed Super Bowl Champion shirts for the losing team. :)
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Re: one of the many reasons I choose to not sell these

Postby bloke » Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:02 pm

In most factories, the polishing people are the highest-paid, because they could easily destroy a whole bunch of other craftmens' work ~OR~ they could (as is their job) prompt people (who are very impressed by "shiny") to buy the product.

no criticism here...but older Rudy Meinl polishing jobs were not much better than adequate, and even (fairly often) featured lacquer runs...but (having sold some new ones in the distant past - back when they weren't crazy-high priced) I never recall anyone rejecting one due to those cosmetic issues. I can, though, understand the importance of so-so tubas being really-really shiny-nice-looking.
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Re: one of the many reasons I choose to not sell these

Postby Wyvern » Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:40 am

bort wrote:What happens to the rejected tubas (which are otherwise fine, except for scratching under the lacquer)?

Most go to a tubas grave yard - yes there is a floor at factory with hundreds of rejected Wessex. A sad sight :cry: Only of use if we want a part for new product development.

Before you ask, we have considered selling as B-stock, but so far have not reached any conclusion on that.

What we did do the end of last factory visit, and plan to do this next one is carry out a preliminary inspection before the tubas go for lacquering or plating, to try and get finishing problems corrected, before it is too late with the final finish being applied.

bloke wrote:In most factories, the polishing people are the highest-paid, because they could easily destroy a whole bunch of other craftmens' work ~OR~ they could (as is their job) prompt people (who are very impressed by "shiny") to buy the product.

The workers in China are also the highest paid - but there is no getting away from the fact that holding a tuba up to a buffing wheel is a hard job. The workers doing such look like they have come out of a coal mine.

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Re: one of the many reasons I choose to not sell these

Postby bloke » Sat Nov 03, 2018 7:29 pm

I suspect the reason that so many tubas are now built with take-apart bracing is due to the fact that it makes them so much more easy to polish.

Not only can nooks and crannies be addressed more quickly/easily, but the weight (of what is supported by the polishing person) is greatly reduced.

There's a reason why - in the distant past - so many tubas and sousaphones sported a satin finish.

Almost no brass instruments - prior to the latter 1960's - sported bright silver finishes.
The craze began with trumpets: Carl "Doc" Severinsen, and his Nehru shirts, wild jackets, and his bright silver Getzen Eterna model trumpet, and his five-nights-a-week appearance on the watched-by-all Johnny Carson "Tonight Show"...and grew from there.

To this day, almost no ("French") horns are silver plated, as it's an absurdly impractical finish for those instruments. Bright silver plated trombones are somewhat rare, with no-F-attachment trombones being where most of those are found. The CSO York tuba was originally a satin silver finish instrument (per typical). Later it was obviously "overhauled", and (also: obviously) someone buffed the holy crap out of it, as it is currently quite lightweight and also quite delicate. "Copies" (other than the Holton and Hirsbrunner copies) seem to strive to copy the post-overhaul buffed-the-crap-out-of-it second life of the CSO York tuba, which (after that overhaul) was a BRIGHT silver finish tuba. Anyone who has ever completely buffed away a satin finish knows how MUCH work that is and how VERY MUCH material must be removed in order to completely obliterate a satin silver finish. Here's a picture of that tuba prior to (again) having had the holy crap buffed out of it:
Image

opinion: Bright silver is an absurd and epically impractical finish for a tuba or sousaphone.

speculation
: Some claim that satin finishes on "instruments of old" were not as totally-saturated (rough) as are modern-day satin silver instruments. I had suspected that this was correct, until I owned a newly-satin-silver finished instrument for well over a decade where handling/occasional-polishing has caused it to begin to resemble the appearance of old satin-silver finished instruments.
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