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Re: Plastic vs. Metal mouthpieces

Postby MaryAnn » Thu May 17, 2018 10:15 am

I think one of the lesser considered uses for plastic pieces is for grade school kids, who drop mouthpieces on a frequent basis. A plastic piece won't make much of a dent in a bell, and you know what happens when a metal one hits the bell.
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Re: Plastic vs. Metal mouthpieces

Postby geomiklas » Thu May 17, 2018 10:18 am

MaryAnn wrote:I think one of the lesser considered uses for plastic pieces is for grade school kids, who drop mouthpieces on a frequent basis. A plastic piece won't make much of a dent in a bell, and you know what happens when a metal one hits the bell.


Excellent consideration. I agree all in that the Kelly 18 is great for kids, and other general playing. Like I stated in my OP, the middle range of the tuba works really well on the Lexan mouthpiece. It is the high Ophicleide and low contrabass range that presented the issues for me.
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Re: Plastic vs. Metal mouthpieces

Postby Fergie » Thu May 17, 2018 10:43 am

smitwill1 wrote:I keep one in the glovebox (is it really a glovebox if no one keeps gloves in there anymore...) to buzz on while driving to a gig if I won't have time to play earlier in the day or in case I forget my "real" one.


Mouthpiece Box* :wink:
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Re: Plastic vs. Metal mouthpieces

Postby NCSUSousa » Thu May 17, 2018 6:17 pm

timothy42b wrote:
Donn wrote:Contact dermatitis specifically can by reputation be acquired at any time, it isn't so much an inherent trait. That's why intimate contact with nickel is not recommended, for anyone.


I grew up not being sensitive to poison ivy, then got a really nasty surprise when that changed.

But what's really scarey is the lone star tick. If it bites you, you can become allergic to the protein in meat. No more steak, burgers, anything. You have to give it all up.


I have a coworker who got bit by one of those lone star tics. Good news - With treatment (by a doc who knows their stuff), it is possible to reverse the allergy to meat. It took him over a year, but he can eat beef again without grabbing an epi-pen.
Also, it's only an allergy to mammal type meat (beef, pork, venison, bison, etc). Poultry and Fish are still ok for people who develop the allergy.
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Re: Plastic vs. Metal mouthpieces

Postby joh_tuba » Sun May 20, 2018 11:00 pm

The Kelly 18 is a better mouthpiece than the metal version it is intended to emulate.

I remain unconvinced that the material makes a lick of difference beyond allergies and grippy-ness on the face.
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Re: Plastic vs. Metal mouthpieces

Postby bloke » Tue May 22, 2018 12:32 am

...some of the same issues with saxophone mouthpieces...
- silver-or-gold-plated brass
- stainless steel
- hard rubber

The thing is this:
Companies that offer BOTH metal AND hard rubber saxophone mouthpieces...well...They don't offer exact duplicate mouthpieces in their metal line and their hard rubber line.

ACTUALLY...
Selmer, Paris (in the distant past) were somewhat faithful (at least on the mouthpieces' interiors, though the outsides of the metal ones tended to be narrower) between metal and hard rubber, and sounded - just about - the same.
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